Stevie Nicks
The Queen of Rock

24-12-02

Checking in with Stevie Nicks, the Fleetwood Mac Queen Bee and solo superstar. Hey let's even go as far as calling her the Queen of Rock.

Interviewer:
Is it ok to be called the Queen of Rock? I mean you were dubbed the Queen of Rock n Roll by Rolling Stone magazine, what do you think about that?


Stevie
Thanks, that�s a compliment. I don�t ever try to think about being above anyone. I mean yes, I do feel I have made a large contribution to music, and I know a lot of girls out there, and guys, look up to me. I love that. I don�t know if I�m the �Queen of Rock,� (laughs), but it feels nice.

Interviewer:
But Stevie, c�mon you�re a living legend in terms of a rock poet.


Stevie:
We did that show, MTV FANATIC they used to play where a huge fan gets to get on and meet their favorite artist and ask questions, in like 1998, and the girl asked me: How does it feel to be a living legend? And I said, �Well, it�s better than being a DEAD LEGEND.�

Interviewer:
Your first solo album, Bella Donna, was a big thing for you. It was released in 1981, and was your first departure from Fleetwood Mac...


Stevie:
Well it wasn't a departure, you know, just me wanting more room and space creatively , but yes it was a big thing, I had never done it alone before. But I needed that, I needed that to reassure myself that I wasn't dependent. I do love Fleetwood Mac, but that helped my confidence a great deal, of course.

Interviewer:
Well yes, naturally. Your first solo album being a multi-platinum success, never hurts ones confidence. You had a special way of combining vulnerability and strength in Bella Donna I think. These are qualities that are somewhat hard to put together, right?


Stevie:
Oh yeah. That's what Bella Donna was all about. I mean the song "Bella Donna," which says, "come in out of the darkness," is what rock 'n roll is, or was. Sometimes women who are with a man, you know, end up depending on him and not being very dependent. It doesn't allow you to be that very much, rock n roll doesn�t. I think the music industry is very male-oriented. Although there are a lot of wonderful women singers around, still I think it's their world...the men's world. Or at least they TRY to make it that, I don�t back down easily you see?

Interviewer:
But now, do you feel that now Fleetwood Mac gives you more creative input that in the past?


Stevie:
Well, Fleetwood Mac never smothered me. But it is a band, and for someone like me, who's very independent and likes things my way, a solo career has been very helpful in making me not feel smothered. And this new album that comes out early next year is very different. We love Christine (McVie), but she's not involved in this, because she doesn't want to be. And we let her be, you know, you can only do so much begging, until it's like, just let her be. But I think our new music is some of the best music we've ever done, and I don't just say that to be saying that. This recording process this time around has been so positive, there's so much positive energy there now. I love it. And yes, I do feel like my input in the music is a whole lot more accepted now.

Interviewer:
There�s a song called �Illume� on the new album, I won�t ask too much about it, because I know the whole album thing is hush-hush right now, but tell us what it is about?


Stevie:
Illume a very interesting song actually. I wrote it after September 11th, you know, so it was one of the first I wrote after those tragedies. It�s just about making it, you know. I was sitting there, thinking about those horrible tragedies in October of 2002, and I was sitting there with just me in the room, and the candle was lit. I love candles, you know. And my heart was still so heavy from everything, and I didn�t know quite what would happen, and we were all like that, confused. I didn�t set out to write a September 11th song, it just happened. It goes � Illume, says the candle that I burn, a reflection in the window,� and that�s just about the inspiration for the song. And I tell you, my heart was so very heavy and full at this time, I was so confused.
And then there are some other parts�
(Pause)
�And I am alone with my thoughts, And how we could make it � And what we have been through, all of the trauma.� I also wrote one called �Get back on the Plane,� and a song called �The towers touched the sky,� but it was just too depressing.

Interviewer:
Do you feel like a stronger person than you were before you were successful?


Stevie:
Yes, definitely. I feel like I can accomplish anything I want to now...so much more confidence, I cannot even begin to tell you.

Interviewer:
When you're 75, I've heard you say you'd just like to be on top of a mountain somewhere, with a huge grand piano, in a beautiful house. Is that still what you want?


Stevie:
For now, that's not what I want. I want to be around people, I want to perform in front of thousands and thousands of fans. I want to record, but yes, by the time I'm 75 I would love that. Just me, my typewriter, my piano and some beautiful huge log cabin on top of the snow-covered mountains. Looking down out some big window, and maybe come out every once in a while and play some benefit show..

Interviewer:
Sounds peaceful. So there will not be a man up on that mountain with you?


Stevie:
There will be somebody. A friend, a man, someone. I don't like being 100% alone. Right now I'm not involved with anybody, but I hope by 75 I will be again. But right now it's still just not my goal. It is nearly impossible to maintain a healthy relationship in the business. And at some point or another, my job gets to them. It's easy to understand. "No I can't have dinner, I have interviews." "But we were in New York all week and we didn't get to have dinner once." "Sorry man, what do you want me to do? Call everyone and cancel?" Because, no you can't just do that. You do not cancel Fleetwood Mac, you don�t call Fleetwood Mac and say �I�m sorry guys, I have a date.� �

Interviewer:
You believe in angels, witches, and magic. But you aren't some spaced out chick living in a dillusional dream, thinking you are still 27 first joining Fleetwood Mac. You love to talk, you're intelligent, you went to college, so how does your love for the mystic come into play with your very normal personality?


Stevie:
I love the mystic world. I am fascinated by it. I think spirits have been with me all along the way, but I can be level-headed and balance that with reality. I still love to cook an omelette, or walk my dogs, I'm very reality centered. I know I'm not the sex symbol of the 70's. I'm not sitting here in my L.A. home thinking that it's still 1975, and I'm on top of the world. I am in a very successful, to this day, rock n roll band, I do not take that for granted, I take it for what it is.

Interviewer:
I think the greatest thing about Fleetwood Mac has always been the ability you all have to create a new and fresh sound with your records, and still blend that signature sound. You played me some of your new album, and it's the same. Tell me a little about this project. Knowing that this album will be very highly listened to when released, are you more careful?


Stevie:
Lindsey is never careful. He takes risks. When we did the follow-up to the hugely successful Rumours, which was called TUSK, it was a double album. First off, of course the record company was dying for us to make Rumours II. They wanted something else squeezed out to create the same effect as Rumours. Lindsey wanted the opposite of that. He was honestly annoyed by the success of Rumours. We were all tired of hearing it for awhile, and Tusk was very different, but it was Fleetwood Mac. So it was a double album, and of course the record company worries right there that it may not do as well. Then, they hear these songs, and they don't song anything like Rumours songs...so they got very scared. But we didn't care, we did it, because we wanted to. And this album, it doesn't sound like Rumours, or Mirage, or Tusk, it has a very distinct sound. So no, we are never really conscious of the fact that people do want us to sound a certain way, to play it safe. I think this new music is great.

Interviewer:
When you tour for this new album, will you do Silver Springs?


Stevie:
Of course, that song is timeless. Lindsey and I are so over our relationship, but we cannot put it away and act like it never happened. If we cut out all of the songs that are about us, and our past relationship, we would be playing all new music, and the fans want to hear the old stuff too you know?

Interviewer:
Well I am so excited about this new album, coming out next year, and the tour, and I thank you so much for talking to me Stevie. Best wishes Stevie.

(Thanks to Tiffany who posted this article)

 


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